Adults Who Have Epilepsy Living at Home with Their Parents 

Epilepsy
June 14, 2020

Adults Who Have Epilepsy Living at Home with Their Parents 

As someone with personal experience with being an adult living with epilepsy and living at home with my parents. There are some pros and cons.

Yes, you may have your parents helping you get through the world because things could have a turn for the worse with your epilepsy but there are times where it could feel like they are overstepping their boundaries and you need some space.

When in doubt, your parents do love you and just want to see you feel both physically and mentally better no matter how annoying.

I have spent the past twelve years living at home with my parents because my epilepsy changed. I experienced things with my epilepsy that I have never seen throughout the years that I have been diagnosed with epilepsy.

During this time, I am really glad that my mom was there for me when I became very sick because she was there for me since day one of my diagnosis of my epilepsy. Although, my mom and I tend to butt heads on many different things, I know that she is always there for me when I need her.

Being an adult living with Epilepsy while living at home with your parents can seem boring at times even though it’s not, but it also can be especially boring when you are unable to drive. People with epilepsy who can not drive, like myself, try their best to get around by using Uber or Lyft but it does get expensive. Your parents may offer to drive you places so you can meet people and make friends but, at the same time, you are thinking why even bother or why would I want to have you drive me, I don’t want my friends to see me.

At the age of 35, my mother keeps  asking me, “when are you getting married and giving me grandchildren you know I am not getting any younger”. If only I had a nickel every time I hear my mother say that. Hearing that goes back to meeting people out in the world. When you live at home with your parents sometimes it is not that easy to meet people, make new friends, and even hopefully start a relationship that hopefully turns into something more like marriage and a family.

It is not that like I don’t want a family and to get married, I do want all of that. It is just hard to meet someone when you are an adult living with epilepsy while living at home with your mom and stepdad.

By Dan Rosenfeld